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tutorial:blocks [2019/11/14 22:02]
fudge
tutorial:blocks [2020/06/14 08:32] (current)
fudge
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 ====== Adding a Block ====== ====== Adding a Block ======
  
-==== Introduction ====+Adding blocks to your mod follows a similar process to [[tutorial:​items|adding an item]]. You can create an instance of ''​Block''​ or a custom class, and then register it under ''​Registry.BLOCK''​. You also need to provide a texture and blockstate/​model file to give your block visuals. For more information on the block model format, view the [[https://​minecraft.gamepedia.com/​Model|Minecraft Wiki Model page]].
  
-To add block to your mod, you will need to register a new instance of the Block classFor more control over your block, you can create a custom block classWe'll also look at adding ​a block model +===== Creating ​Block ===== 
-==== Creating ​Block ====+ 
 +Start by creating an instance of ''​Block''​It can be stored at any location, but we will start at the top of your ''​ModInitializer''​The ''​Block''​ constructor requires an ''​AbstractBlock.Settings''​ instance, which is builder for configuring ​block propertiesFabric provides ​''​FabricBlockSettings''​ builder class with more available options.
  
-To start, create an instance of Block in your main mod class. Block'​s constructor uses the FabricBlockSettings builder to set up basic properties of the block, such as hardness and resistance: 
 <code java [enable_line_numbers="​true"​]>​ <code java [enable_line_numbers="​true"​]>​
-public class ExampleMod implements ModInitializer +public class ExampleMod implements ModInitializer { 
-+ 
-    // an instance ​of our new block +    /* Declare and initialize our custom block instance
-    public static final Block EXAMPLE_BLOCK = new Block(FabricBlockSettings.of(Material.METAL).build()); +       We set our block material to METAL, which requires a pickaxe to efficiently break. 
-    ​[...]+       ​Hardness represents how long the break takes to break. Stone has a hardness of 1.5f, while Obsidian has a hardness of 50.0f. 
 +    */ 
 +    public static final Block EXAMPLE_BLOCK = new Block(FabricBlockSettings.of(Material.METAL).hardness(4.0f)); 
 +    ​ 
 +    @Override 
 +    public void onInitialize() { 
 +         
 +    }
 } }
 </​code>​ </​code>​
  
-==== Registering ​Block ====+==== Registering ​your Block ====
  
-Registering blocks is the same as registering items. Call //​Registry.register//​ and pass in the appropriate arguments.+Blocks should be registered under the ''​Block.REGISTRY''​ registry. Call //​Registry.register//​ and pass in the appropriate arguments.
  
-<code java [enable_line_numbers="​true"​]>​ +<code java [enable_line_numbers="​true",​highlight_lines_extra="​11"​]>​ 
-public class ExampleMod implements ModInitializer +public class ExampleMod implements ModInitializer { 
-+ 
-    // block creation +    ​public static final Block EXAMPLE_BLOCK = new Block(FabricBlockSettings.of(Material.METAL).hardness(4.0f));​
-    ​[...]+
     ​     ​
     @Override     @Override
-    public void onInitialize() +    public void onInitialize() {
-    ​{+
         Registry.register(Registry.BLOCK,​ new Identifier("​tutorial",​ "​example_block"​),​ EXAMPLE_BLOCK);​         Registry.register(Registry.BLOCK,​ new Identifier("​tutorial",​ "​example_block"​),​ EXAMPLE_BLOCK);​
     }     }
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 </​code>​ </​code>​
  
-Your block will //not// be accessible as an item, but it can be seen in-game by using ''/​setblock tutorial:​example_block.''​+Your custom ​block will //not// be accessible as an item yet, but it can be seen in-game by using the command ​''/​setblock tutorial:​example_block''​.
  
-==== Registering ​a BlockItem ​====+==== Registering ​an Item for your Block ====
  
 In most cases, you want to be able to place your block using an item. To do this, you need to register a corresponding BlockItem in the item registry. You can do this by registering an instance of BlockItem under Registry.ITEM. The registry name of the item should usually be the same as the registry name of the block. In most cases, you want to be able to place your block using an item. To do this, you need to register a corresponding BlockItem in the item registry. You can do this by registering an instance of BlockItem under Registry.ITEM. The registry name of the item should usually be the same as the registry name of the block.
  
-<code java [enable_line_numbers="​true"​]>​ +<code java [enable_line_numbers="​true",​highlight_lines_extra="​12"​]>​ 
-public class ExampleMod implements ModInitializer +public class ExampleMod implements ModInitializer { 
-+ 
-    /block creation +    /* Declare and initialize our custom ​block instance. 
-    ​[…]+       We set out block material to METAL, which requires a pickaxe to efficiently break. 
 +       ​Hardness represents how long the break takes to break. Stone has a hardness of 1.5f, while Obsidian has a hardness of 50.0f. 
 +    ​*/ 
 +    public static final Block EXAMPLE_BLOCK = new Block(FabricBlockSettings.of(Material.METAL));​
     ​     ​
     @Override     @Override
-    public void onInitialize() +    public void onInitialize() { 
-    ​+        ​Registry.register(Registry.BLOCK, new Identifier("​tutorial",​ "​example_block"​),​ EXAMPLE_BLOCK);​
-        ​// block registration +
-        [...] +
-        ​+
         Registry.register(Registry.ITEM,​ new Identifier("​tutorial",​ "​example_block"​),​ new BlockItem(EXAMPLE_BLOCK,​ new Item.Settings().group(ItemGroup.MISC)));​         Registry.register(Registry.ITEM,​ new Identifier("​tutorial",​ "​example_block"​),​ new BlockItem(EXAMPLE_BLOCK,​ new Item.Settings().group(ItemGroup.MISC)));​
     }     }
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 </​code>​ </​code>​
  
-==== Giving your block a model ====+===== Giving your Block Visuals =====
  
-As you probably have noticedthe block is simply ​a purple and black checkerboard pattern in-game. This is Minecraft'​s way of showing you that the block has no modelModeling a block is a little bit more difficult than modeling an item. You will need three files: A blockstate file, a block model file, and an item model file if the block has a BlockItem. Textures are also required if you don't use vanilla ones. The files should be located here:+At this pointyour new block will appear as a purple and black checkerboard pattern in-game. This is Minecraft'​s way of showing you that something went wrong while loading ​the block's assets (or visuals)A full list of issues will be printed to your log when you run your client. You will need these files to give your block visuals: 
 +  * A blockstate file 
 +  * A block model file 
 +  * A texture 
 +  * An item model file (if the block has an item associated with it). 
 + 
 +The files should be located here:
  
   Blockstate: src/​main/​resources/​assets/​tutorial/​blockstates/​example_block.json   Blockstate: src/​main/​resources/​assets/​tutorial/​blockstates/​example_block.json
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   Block Texture: src/​main/​resources/​assets/​tutorial/​textures/​block/​example_block.png   Block Texture: src/​main/​resources/​assets/​tutorial/​textures/​block/​example_block.png
  
-The blockstate file determines which model that the block should use depending on it'​s ​blockstate. ​As our block has only one statethe file is a simple as this:+The blockstate file determines which model block should use depending on its blockstate. ​Our block doesn'​t have any potential statesso we cover everything with ''""''​. ​
  
 <code JavaScript src/​main/​resources/​assets/​tutorial/​blockstates/​example_block.json>​ <code JavaScript src/​main/​resources/​assets/​tutorial/​blockstates/​example_block.json>​
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 </​code>​ </​code>​
  
-The block model file defines the shape and texture of your block. ​We will use block/​cube_all,​ which will allow us to easily set the same texture ​on all sides of the block.+The block model file defines the shape and texture of your block. ​Our model will have ''​block/​cube_all''​as a parent, which applies ​the texture ​''​all''​ to //​all// ​sides of the block.
  
 <code JavaScript src/​main/​resources/​assets/​tutorial/​models/​block/​example_block.json>​ <code JavaScript src/​main/​resources/​assets/​tutorial/​models/​block/​example_block.json>​
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 </​code>​ </​code>​
  
-In most cases you want the block to look the same in handTo do this, you can make an item file that inherits from the block model file:+In most casesyou will want the block to look the same in item formYou can make an item model that has the block model file as a parent, which makes it appear exactly like the block:
  
 <code JavaScript src/​main/​resources/​assets/​tutorial/​models/​item/​example_block.json>​ <code JavaScript src/​main/​resources/​assets/​tutorial/​models/​item/​example_block.json>​
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 </​code>​ </​code>​
  
-Load up Minecraft and your block should ​finally ​have a texture!+Load up Minecraft and your block should have visuals!
  
-==== Adding a block loot table ====+===== Configuring Block Drops =====
  
-The block must have a loot table for any items to drop when the block is broken. Assuming ​you have created an item for your block and registered it using the same name as the block, the following file will produce regular block drops ''​src/main/resources/data/wikitut/​loot_tables/​blocks/​example_block.json''​.+To make your block drop items when brokenyou will need a //loot table//. The following file will cause your block to drop its respective item form when broken: ​
  
 <code JavaScript src/​main/​resources/​data/​tutorial/​loot_tables/​blocks/​example_block.json>​ <code JavaScript src/​main/​resources/​data/​tutorial/​loot_tables/​blocks/​example_block.json>​
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 </​code>​ </​code>​
  
-When broken in survival mode, the block will now drop an item.+===== Creating a Custom Block Class =====
  
-==== Creating a Block class ==== +The above approach works well for simple items but falls short when you want a block with //unique// mechanics. We'll create a //separate// class that extends ​''​Block'' ​to do this. The class needs a constructor that takes in an ''​AbstractBlock.Settings''​ argument:
-When creating a simple block the above approach works wellbut sometimes ​you want a //special// block with unique ​mechanics. We'll create a separate class that extends Block to do this. The class needs a constructor that takes in a BlockSettings argument.+
  
 <code java [enable_line_numbers="​true"​]>​ <code java [enable_line_numbers="​true"​]>​
-public class ExampleBlock extends Block +public class ExampleBlock extends Block { 
-+ 
-    public ExampleBlock(Settings settings) +    public ExampleBlock(Settings settings) {
-    ​{+
         super(settings);​         super(settings);​
     }     }
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 </​code>​ </​code>​
  
-Just like we did in the item tutorial, you can override methods in the block class for custom functionality. ​Say you want your block to be transparent:​+You can override methods in the block class for custom functionality. ​Here's an implementation of the ''​onUse''​ method, which is called when you right-click the block. We check if the interaction is occurring on the server, and then send the player a message saying, //"​Hello,​ world!"//​
  
-<code java> +<code java [enable_line_numbers="​true",​highlight_lines_extra="​8,​9,​10,​11,​12,​13,​14,​15"​]
-    @Environment(EnvType.CLIENT) +@Override 
-    public ​BlockRenderLayer getRenderLayer() { +public class ExampleBlock extends Block { 
-        ​return BlockRenderLayer.TRANSLUCENT;+ 
 +    public ​ExampleBlock(Settings settings) { 
 +        ​super(settings);
     }     }
 +
 +    @Override
 +    public ActionResult onUse(BlockState state, World world, BlockPos pos, PlayerEntity player, Hand hand, BlockHitResult hit) {
 +        if (!world.isClient) {
 +            player.sendMessage(new LiteralText("​Hello,​ world!"​),​ false);
 +        }
 +
 +        return ActionResult.SUCCESS;​
 +    }
 +}
 </​code>​ </​code>​
  
-To add this block into the game, replace //new Block// with //new ExampleBlock// ​when you register it.+To use your custom ​block class, replace //new Block// with //new ExampleBlock//​:
  
-<code java [enable_line_numbers="​true"​]>​ +<code java [enable_line_numbers="​true",​highlight_lines_extra="​7"​]>​ 
-public class ExampleMod implements ModInitializer +public class ExampleMod implements ModInitializer { 
-+ 
-    // an instance of our new item +    public static final ExampleBlock EXAMPLE_BLOCK = new ExampleBlock(Block.Settings.of(Material.STONE).hardness(4.0f)); 
-    public static final ExampleBlock EXAMPLE_BLOCK = new ExampleBlock(Block.Settings.of(Material.STONE));​ +    ​ 
-    ​[...]+    @Override 
 +    public void onInitialize() { 
 +        Registry.register(Registry.BLOCK, new Identifier("​tutorial",​ "​example_block"​),​ EXAMPLE_BLOCK);​ 
 +        Registry.register(Registry.ITEM,​ new Identifier("​tutorial",​ "​example_block"​),​ new BlockItem(EXAMPLE_BLOCK,​ new Item.Settings().group(ItemGroup.MISC)));​ 
 +    }
 } }
 </​code>​ </​code>​
  
-Your custom ​block should now be transparent! +==== Custom VoxelShape ==== 
-==== Next Steps ====+ 
 +When using block models that do not //​entirely//​ fill the block (eg. Anvil, Slab, Stairs), adjacent blocks hide their faces: 
 + 
 +{{:​tutorial:​voxelshape_wrong.png?​200|}} 
 + 
 +To fix this, we have to define the ''​VoxelShape''​ of the new block: 
 + 
 +<​code>​ 
 + ​@Override 
 + ​public VoxelShape getOutlineShape(BlockState state, BlockView view, BlockPos pos, EntityContext ctx) { 
 +     ​return VoxelShapes.cuboid(0f,​ 0f, 0f, 1f, 1.0f, 0.5f); 
 + } 
 +</​code>​ 
 + 
 +Note that the //collision shape// of the block defaults to the outline shape if it is not specified. 
 + 
 +{{:​tutorial:​voxelshape_fixed.png?​200|}} 
 + 
 +===== Next Steps =====
 [[tutorial:​blockstate|Adding simple state to a block, like ints and booleans]]. ​ [[tutorial:​blockstate|Adding simple state to a block, like ints and booleans]]. ​
  
-[[tutorial:​blockentity|Giving blocks a block entity so they can have advanced state like inventories ​and classes]]. Also needed for many things like GUI and custom block rendering.+[[tutorial:​blockentity|Giving blocks a block entity so they can have advanced state like inventories]]. Also needed for many things like GUI and custom block rendering.
tutorial/blocks.1573768929.txt.gz · Last modified: 2019/11/14 22:02 by fudge